Part of being able to play the game of golf well and score well, is making good decisions. Nearly every shot you have to play in a typical run of golf, you’ll have a decision to make.

Whether it’s a Tee shot, you’re deciding what club to choose or what side of the fairway it will end up on. Whether it’s the second shot and you’re thinking, “Should I aim at the pin, which is cut just over the bunker or play more towards the middle of the green?” It could be a par five and you had a great Tee shot and you’re deciding whether to go for the green in two shots or not.  What will produce a better score?

In scoring well and making good course management decisions, it all comes down to percentages and there is a very simple system called the 70% rule, which will help improve your game of golf and manage your decision making better. 

Example:

Imagine you want a par four and you’ve had a good Tee shot which has left you with I’ve a hundred – a hundred forty-five yards left to the pin. The pin’s cut central but toward the front of the green, quite tight toward the front of the green.  Now, in deciding whether you will aim for this pin for not, ask yourself this question:

“If I aim for the pin can I be successful 70 percent of the time or more?”

If the answer is yes, then you are going to aim at the pin and no doubt you are trying to get the ball close to the hole. 

If the answer is no, you are choosing the wrong shot. In this situation you need to play past the pin or into the centre of the green.  That way you’ll be successful 70 percent of the time or more!

You can apply that rule to every situation.  If there’s a Tee shot, you’ve got a tight fairway and you’re not sure whether to hit your ball with a driver or not, ask yourself this question:

 “If you had ten balls and ten drivers, would you get your ball on the fairway seven times out of ten? If the answer is yes, then using the driver is the right shot.  If the answer’s no, you’ll need to switch clubs.  Use a three-wood or a lower numbered iron until you are comfortable that you can hit the fairway 70 percent of the time or more. 

The same rule applies for going for the par five holes in two shots or you’ve missed the green in a tricky situation and you don’t know how much risk to take with your shot. Apply the same rule!